Dedicated to books kids LOVE to read! --- "So it is with children who learn to read fluently and well: They begin to take flight into whole new worlds as effortlessly as young birds take to the sky." - William James

You Choose by Pippa Goodhart
Corgi Children’s, 2004
I love this concept. Two of my kids are forever pointing at characters in picture books we’re reading and saying “This is you, and this is me”. So this book by Pippa Goodhart really draws them in because they get to point and make choices on every page. They love that! Each spread poses a question. What kind of home would you choose? What would you put in it?  What pet would you have? Who would you choose for family and friend? Where would you go? What would you eat? What would you wear? What would you sleep in? It is fantastic for inspiring their little imaginations. Each time they read the book and pore over Nick Sharrat's illustrations they are catapaulted into different scenarios based on their choices.

 As far as interactive books go, this is a winner.

You Choose by Pippa Goodhart

Corgi Children’s, 2004

I love this concept. Two of my kids are forever pointing at characters in picture books we’re reading and saying “This is you, and this is me”. So this book by Pippa Goodhart really draws them in because they get to point and make choices on every page. They love that! Each spread poses a question. What kind of home would you choose? What would you put in it?  What pet would you have? Who would you choose for family and friend? Where would you go? What would you eat? What would you wear? What would you sleep in? It is fantastic for inspiring their little imaginations. Each time they read the book and pore over Nick Sharrat's illustrations they are catapaulted into different scenarios based on their choices.

 As far as interactive books go, this is a winner.

George’s Marvellous Medicine by Roald Dahl
Puffin Books, 1981
Any of Roald Dahl's books are fun to read aloud to kids because of the  language he uses and his unique way with made up words. George's Marvellous Medicine is no exception, maybe because we have three little boys in our house who think the fact that George's Grandma has a “small puckered up mouth like a dog's bottom” is hilarious! Be warned though, after they've read a couple of Roald Dahl books, don't be surprised when your kids go around calling each other filthy old frumpets, snozwangers and whangdoodles for a month.
Quentin Blake's illustrations are perfect.

George’s Marvellous Medicine by Roald Dahl

Puffin Books, 1981

Any of Roald Dahl's books are fun to read aloud to kids because of the  language he uses and his unique way with made up words. George's Marvellous Medicine is no exception, maybe because we have three little boys in our house who think the fact that George's Grandma has a “small puckered up mouth like a dog's bottom” is hilarious! Be warned though, after they've read a couple of Roald Dahl books, don't be surprised when your kids go around calling each other filthy old frumpets, snozwangers and whangdoodles for a month.

Quentin Blake's illustrations are perfect.

Grandpa Green by Lane Smith
Roaring Book Press, 2011
Grandpa Green is a clever book about a little boy exploring in his Grandpa’s garden. Each manicured shrub tells a story about his Grandpa’s life and memories. In a way it’s a tribute to everybody’s Grandpa or Great Grandpa, and remembering the lives they’ve lived. Growing up on a farm, fighting in a war, getting married, having children, and growing old. The illustrations are very well done and Lane Smith has found the right balance between heart felt and sentimental, without being weepy or cheesy. It’s a fun book.

Grandpa Green by Lane Smith

Roaring Book Press, 2011

Grandpa Green is a clever book about a little boy exploring in his Grandpa’s garden. Each manicured shrub tells a story about his Grandpa’s life and memories. In a way it’s a tribute to everybody’s Grandpa or Great Grandpa, and remembering the lives they’ve lived. Growing up on a farm, fighting in a war, getting married, having children, and growing old. The illustrations are very well done and Lane Smith has found the right balance between heart felt and sentimental, without being weepy or cheesy. It’s a fun book.

What Do You Do With a Tail Like This? by Steve Jenkins
Houghton Mifflin, 2003

In our house we love non-fiction, we love documentaries and we love learning about everything, especially animals! Steve Jenkins' and Robin Page's paper cut out illustrations are phenomenal and so detailed, and this book teaches kids about animal features and how different animals have different uses for these features. For example, “What do you do with a nose like this?” Kids will recognise some of those noses, but will have fun guessing which nose belongs to each animal. The next page reveals the animals and tells us what they do with their particular nose: “If you're a platypus you use your nose to dig in the mud. If you're an elephant you use your nose to give yourself a bath”, and so on. Brilliant!

Watch this fascinating youtube clip to see how Steve Jenkins makes his paper cut out illustrations for another book of his, The Animal Book.

What Do You Do With a Tail Like This? by Steve Jenkins

Houghton Mifflin, 2003

In our house we love non-fiction, we love documentaries and we love learning about everything, especially animals! Steve Jenkins' and Robin Page's paper cut out illustrations are phenomenal and so detailed, and this book teaches kids about animal features and how different animals have different uses for these features. For example, “What do you do with a nose like this?” Kids will recognise some of those noses, but will have fun guessing which nose belongs to each animal. The next page reveals the animals and tells us what they do with their particular nose: “If you're a platypus you use your nose to dig in the mud. If you're an elephant you use your nose to give yourself a bath”, and so on. Brilliant!

Watch this fascinating youtube clip to see how Steve Jenkins makes his paper cut out illustrations for another book of his, The Animal Book.

The Action Bible by Sergio Cariello
David C. Cook, 2010

We’ve been through a lot of Bibles at bedtime, and The Action Bible is definitely the best at the moment for three little boys. It is one long comic strip retelling key parts of God’s redemptive story in chronological order. The artist, Sergio Cariello, has broken down the stories and brought them to life, adding extra bits of cultural and historical context that you don’t often catch in kids Bibles, through the detailed pictures. Kids are intrigued as they follow the dialogue and the action unfolds from each strip to the next.

The Action Bible by Sergio Cariello

David C. Cook, 2010

We’ve been through a lot of Bibles at bedtime, and The Action Bible is definitely the best at the moment for three little boys. It is one long comic strip retelling key parts of God’s redemptive story in chronological order. The artist, Sergio Cariello, has broken down the stories and brought them to life, adding extra bits of cultural and historical context that you don’t often catch in kids Bibles, through the detailed pictures. Kids are intrigued as they follow the dialogue and the action unfolds from each strip to the next.

The Way Back Home by Oliver Jeffers
Philomel Books, 2008

I could fill these pages with books by Oliver Jeffers. He is one of my favourite authors and his illustrations are just beautiful. The Way Back Home is such a cute story about a boy who finds an aeroplane in his closet and does what any young adventurer would do: puts on his flying goggles and flies it to the moon. Of course he runs out of petrol on the moon, and then meets an alien who is also stranded on the moon due to engine trouble. Not to worry, our little adventurer will simply abseil back to his house to get some supplies.
You should watch a clever youtube clip about Oliver Jeffers: Picture Book Maker here.

The Way Back Home by Oliver Jeffers

Philomel Books, 2008

I could fill these pages with books by Oliver Jeffers. He is one of my favourite authors and his illustrations are just beautiful. The Way Back Home is such a cute story about a boy who finds an aeroplane in his closet and does what any young adventurer would do: puts on his flying goggles and flies it to the moon. Of course he runs out of petrol on the moon, and then meets an alien who is also stranded on the moon due to engine trouble. Not to worry, our little adventurer will simply abseil back to his house to get some supplies.

You should watch a clever youtube clip about Oliver Jeffers: Picture Book Maker here.

Where’s Wally by Martin Handford
Walker Books UK, 1987

Where’s Wally is showing no signs of slowing down in terms of popularity. Kids love books that engage them to do something. Where’s Wally, first published in 1987 by Walker Books in the UK, has got to be the best interactive book series of all time. For younger kids who can’t read, the simple challenge of finding Wally and discovering so many little details in the pictures as they search, is enough to keep them occupied for a long time. For older kids there are extra challenges to complete, so these books appeal to a wide age group. Even adults will have trouble putting the book down once they are engaged!
There’s not a lot of info about Martin Handford, the creator of the Wally character. And apparently he hasn’t given an interview since 1990. But you can read a good article about how the Wally series came about here.

Where’s Wally by Martin Handford

Walker Books UK, 1987

Where’s Wally is showing no signs of slowing down in terms of popularity. Kids love books that engage them to do something. Where’s Wally, first published in 1987 by Walker Books in the UK, has got to be the best interactive book series of all time. For younger kids who can’t read, the simple challenge of finding Wally and discovering so many little details in the pictures as they search, is enough to keep them occupied for a long time. For older kids there are extra challenges to complete, so these books appeal to a wide age group. Even adults will have trouble putting the book down once they are engaged!

There’s not a lot of info about Martin Handford, the creator of the Wally character. And apparently he hasn’t given an interview since 1990. But you can read a good article about how the Wally series came about here.